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The MovingWorlds Institute: Transitioning to a social good career

The MovingWorlds Institute: Transitioning to a social good career

A growing body of research is demonstrating that professionals want their work to deliver a sense of purpose. Imperative and LinkedIn’s 2016 Workforce Purpose Index found that 74% of people surveyed globally want purposeful work, while companies with clearly articulated purposeful objectives experience higher growth.

These results indicate that increasing numbers of early and mid-career professionals are looking for roles in organisations that achieve positive social impact, and this is happening across a broad range of sectors. Finding practical, skills-based experience in “social good” organisations can be really challenging, especially for recent graduates. A Master’s degree and domestic internship experience is increasingly necessitating other, supplementary on-the-job training to ensure job seekers can hit the ground running. Finding an industry mentor is a great way to obtain support and insider advice, but colleagues and managers can sometimes be busy with their own work so that can take some time. Likewise, volunteering overseas is another avenue for job seekers and professionals. While this can certainly be a worthwhile experience, it can also be fraught with complexities. Volunteers should ensure that this experience is mutually beneficial for both the host community and themselves and do some thorough research beforehand. For those already working full-time, finding the time to diversify skills and develop new, practical experience is tricky.

MovingWorlds, a Seattle-based social enterprise that has popularised the Experteering movement has just launched an initiative to help high achieving professionals transition to “social good” careers: The MovingWorlds Institute (MWI).

During the six month program, a cohort of 30 selected applicants will receive networking, coaching and mentoring experience based on the participants’ current strengths and career aspirations. The program kicks off with a three-day immersive program in Seattle to teach real-world design-thinking and shared-value skills. During this initial stage, the program team, led by social enterprise practitioners and university faculty, will match participants with an industry mentor based on their skills and career goals.

Kelly Experteering with Tenoli in Mexico
Kelly Experteering with Tenoli in Mexico

“MWI was designed in the spirit of MovingWorlds: Helping changemakers in the field access expertise to overcome any challenge, but it adds something special to benefit the Experteer too,” said MWI’s Director Cole Hoover. “It builds on the recognition that when people go Experteering, it’s a transformative life experience, and by adding an experiential learning model complete with theory, goal setting, mentoring, conceptualising, applying, reflecting, and generalising, it can be a transformative, career catalyst, too.”

The program is mostly conducted virtually, with support from the industry mentor and monthly calls with a diverse group of social change leaders around the world. The team will match each participant with a placement to undertake a 3 to 16 week Experteering trip overseas, custom fit to the participant’s schedule, skills and career aspirations.

At the conclusion of the Experteering project, the final month in the six month program will see participants work with two career advisors to help them market the experience on their resume and LinkedIn profile, as well as prepare them for interviews.

The MWI program is a great way for those looking to utilise and diversify their current skillsets to make positive social change while receiving support from industry mentors along the way.

 

For more information you can visit the website here.

Featured image: Jamie, Experteering through MovingWorlds at Sistema B in Buenos Aires.

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The WhyDev writing team consists of Brendan, Megan, Zoe and Clemency. Check out more about the team on the "About Us" page.

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